Greenfield Avenue

From Pittsburgh Streets
Greenfield Avenue
Neighborhoods Greenfield, Hazelwood

Greenfield Avenue was officially opened by a city ordinance in 1872.[1]

The neighborhood of Greenfield was named by City Council member William Barker, Jr., a local resident who lived along a tributary of Four Mile Run.[2][3][4] The 1872 Hopkins atlas shows the house of W. H. Barker on Greenfield Avenue (which is unlabeled), near its modern intersection with Haldane Street.[5]

References

  1. "An ordinance authorizing the Opening of Greenfield avenue from Hazlewood avenue to Monongahela River." Pittsburgh city ordinance, 1872, no. 138. Passed Sept. 23, 1872. Ordinance Book 3, p. 260. In The Municipal Record: Containing the proceedings of the Select and Common Councils of the City of Pittsburgh, together with the ordinances, &c.: With an index, vol. IV, p. 96, Pittsburgh Daily Gazette, Pittsburgh, 1872 (Internet Archive pghmunicipalrecord1872). [view source]ordinance-1872-138
  2. Pittsburgh Neighborhood Alliance. An Atlas of the Greenfield Neighborhood of Pittsburgh 1977, p. 1. 1977. Historic Pittsburgh 31735070288927; https://ucsur.pitt.edu/files/center/1977/greenfield%20PNA%201977.pdf. [view source]pna-greenfield
  3. Anita Kulina. Millhunks and Renegades: A portrait of a Pittsburgh neighborhood, pp. 62–63. Brandt Street Press, Pittsburgh, 2003, ISBN 9780974260730. LCCN 2003107522. [view source]kulina
  4. Bob Regan. The Names of Pittsburgh: How the city, neighborhoods, streets, parks and more got their names, p. 42. The Local History Company, Pittsburgh, 2009, ISBN 978-0-9770429-7-5. [view source]regan
  5. Atlas of the Cities of Pittsburgh, Allegheny, and the Adjoining Boroughs, p. 69. G. M. Hopkins & Co., Philadelphia, 1872. http://historicpittsburgh.org/maps-hopkins/1872-atlas-pittsburgh-allegheny; 1872 layer at Pittsburgh Historic Maps (https://esriurl.com/pittsburgh). [view source]hopkins-1872