Notes:Stockton Avenue

From Pittsburgh Streets

To do

  • Source:Rimmel-commons: "Back in the days when the town site was laid out the city fathers called the street Second Bank because of its height and to distinguish it from Bank Lane that ran along the Allegheny River. Later the street was changed to Stockton Avenue in honor of the Rev. Joseph Stockton who preached before 1812 beneath a tree on the South Common near Beaver, now Arch Street."
    • Also Source:Miller, p. 34.
    • Source:Barbeau illustrates the slope at the South Common. This is apparently what the name "Second Bank" refers to?
    • Source:Fleming-old-penn-4: "The Commons in old Allegheny in 1870 were made into the North Side parks as we now have them. The South Common extended from Seminary Hill to Cedar avenue, East, and was commonly called First and Second Banks, the former extending from the canal to Bank lane, the ground now occupied by the Pennsylvania tracks and station. The Second Bank embraced that part of the common from Stockton avenue to Bank lane, this latter now South avenue. Many of the pretentious residences on Stockton avenue, West, are still standing. The old South Common exists only the little park between Federal and Sandusky streets."
    • Source:Rooney-peterson, p. 17: "Allegheny's most exclusive residential area in the 1820s and 1830s may have been the lots facing the South Common, on what is now the southern perimeter of Allegheny Center Mall. Residents called this area the Second Bank because of its elevation above lower Federal Street. Lafayette visited the Second Bank home of Thomas Barlow in 1825. The industrialist and abolitionist Charles Avery and the prominent merchant Harvey Childs were early Second Bank residents. Later in the century, Allegheny's government named the Second Bank Stockton Avenue."

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Source:Miller-chronicles, pp. 53–55